Odyssey

Topics: Ancient Greece, Penelope, Odyssey Pages: 2 (743 words) Published: April 28, 2014
Essay: The Odyssey

Over two thousand years ago, great epics such as the Odyssey were written, illustrating human weaknesses and wickedness of the time, and yet, people today seem no different. As history unfolds, it is plain to see the recurrent problems over which humans continue to stumble. Comparing modern society to ancient Greek society, it is easy to discover more similarities than differences in specific aspects of either community. In Ancient Greece, the setting of the Odyssey, negative attitudes, such as self-pride, little value of another person’s life, and bias against weak (or anyone looked upon as minor) were prominent characteristics of their society.

People take pride in many things: their religion or faith, their possessions, and most importantly, themselves, which include one’s status and purpose for living. Pride has dominated humankind since the fall of man, and with every new generation, there comes a natural infection of the same faults. In the Odyssey, the main protagonist Odysseus declares, “I am Odysseus, son of Laertes, well known to all for my deceptive skills—my fame extends all the way to heaven.” This can be recognized as a very arrogant way of thinking. Many people seek attention and fame, but to be accepted and praised as an illusive, guileful individual is far from honorable. With one sin, there will most likely be another linked to it, creating a chain of sins.

Murder is a very serious subject, as well. In the Odyssey, when Odysseus finally returns home, he loses his temper and throws what looks to be a manic fit. As a result, he ends up slaughtering most of his wife’s suitors, and even some of his own servants. He cared only for himself, and thoughtlessly killed anyone who was in the way. Today, there are still many people around the world that take others’ lives, whether it is because they are criminally insane, or the their religion prods them to do so. Those people have a reason—perhaps not a very just reason, but a...
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