Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian Art Compared A very brief overview of Greek art compared to Egyptian art (ancient that is). It basically gives details about both comparing them.

Topics: Sculpture, Ancient Egypt, Egypt Pages: 2 (538 words) Published: February 2, 2004
Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian Art Compared

Egyptian art comes from the paintings the Egyptians created in the tombs of rich people when they died. These pictures were supposed to help the dead person out when he or she reached the next world, where the Egyptians thought you lived after you died in this world. At first, carvers had a hard time painting the pictures but in about 2160 B.C. they started taking short cuts and made their work sloppier.

Greek art was much different from the Egyptians art. One of their styles of art was sculpting. In Crete, between about 1700 and 1450 BC, the Minoans produced a lot of medium-sized figurines, mainly made of metal and ivory. The Greeks learned how to make big stone statues from the Egyptians. At this time many Greek men were working in Egypt as soldiers, and so they had a chance to see Egyptian statues and learn how they were made. One Egyptian technique is to have a triangle for the face and two upside-down triangles for the hair. This makes the hair help support the neck, which otherwise might be too thin to hold up the head. Another Egyptian idea is to have one foot a little in front of the other, which also helps the statue to stand up and not fall over. One difference is that the Greeks always made their statues nude (without clothes), while the Egyptian statues always wore clothes. This is because the Greeks thought that men's bodies were sacred and that the gods liked to see them. In the Severe style, sculptors began to make statues more true to life, and with more feeling in their faces and their movements. Instead of all being standing straight up and looking sacred and peaceful, now statues began to do things: drive a chariot, carry something, throw a spear, or ride a horse. And sometimes they looked sad, or frightened, or nasty, depending on who they were supposed to be. At the same time, sculptors took more interest in making the muscles and bones look true to life too. The Severe style didn't last...
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