Ancient Greek Art - Summary

Topics: Ancient Greece, Parthenon, Athens Pages: 7 (2060 words) Published: October 7, 2012
RUNNING HEAD: ANCIENT GREEK ART AND MYTH

Ancient Greek Art and myth
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Ancient Greek Art and myth

Greek art has set a benchmark for Western civilization that has endured to this day. The ancient Greek models are regarded as classics and canons sculptural and architectural styles have been recreated again and again throughout the history of the West. Art and architecture developed in Greece and its colonies between 1100 BC and the first century BC although it had its origin in the Aegean civilization, its subsequent development has become one of the most influential artistic periods of culture. Greek art is characterized by naturalistic representation of the human figure, not only in the formal aspect, but also the expressive intent of the movement and emotions. The human body, both in the representations of gods in human beings, thus became the fundamental motive of Greek art, associated myths, literature and everyday life (Whitley, 2001).

The Ancient Greek Art (Archaic Period)
Sculpture
The Greeks began to carve in stone inspired by the monumental pieces from Egypt and Mesopotamia. The sculptures in the round shared the characteristic strength and front position of Eastern models. The male and female sculptures, from about the year 575 BC, their faces reflected in the so-called archaic smile, which perhaps was used by the Greeks as a device providing the figures a distinctive human trait (Whitley, 2001). In Greek sculptures displayed accented the main features of the body and express increasingly precise knowledge of human anatomy. In some works, unlike older ones, you can see a more detailed study of the muscular and anatomical structure. The female figures, dressed and upright, offering a wide variety of expressions, their clothes are carved and painted with the delicacy and thoroughness characteristics of sculpture from this period. The reliefs, which were developed after the sculpture in the round, usually represent figures in movement. The sculptors of the Archaic period continued melting bronze sculptures. Examples of the sixth century BC describe the muscles schematically by representing a narrow arc at the lower limit of the chest and horizontal marks (William , 1981).

[pic] [pic] Lady of Auxerre Torso of Hera of Samos The three predominant types were standing naked young (kouros), the girl dressed up (kore) and the seated woman. They all emphasize the essential characteristics of the body and express increasingly precise knowledge of human anatomy. The reason for the representation of these young people was part of such a tomb and a votive character. Some examples are the Apollo preserved primitive Metropolitan Museum in New York, Lemnos Strangford Apollo from the British Museum in London, much more work late, and the Kouros of Anavysos preserved in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. In these works, unlike older ones, you can see a more detailed study of the muscular and anatomical structure. The female figures, dressed and upright, offering a wide variety of expressions, as can be seen in the sculptures of the Acropolis Museum in Athens. His clothes are carved and painted with the delicacy and thoroughness characteristic of sculpture from this period (Orjan , 1990).  [pic] [pic] Kore Kouros

The sculptural reliefs were carved after the free-standing sculpture in the round or represented his figures in motion. The friezes Siphnios Treasury, in the temple of Apollo at Delphi (Archaeological Museum of Delphi), showing one of the...

References: Aaron J. Paul, (1997), Fragments of Antiquity: Drawing upon Greek Vases, Harvard University Art Museums Bulletin, Vol. V, No. 2 pp. 4-10.
Anthony M. Snodgrass, (2001), The Dark Age of Greece, oxford press, p.102-152
John Beazley, (1956). Attic Black-Figure Vase Painters, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
John K. Papadopoulos, James F. Vedder, Toby Schreiber, (1998), Drawing Circles: Experimental Archaeology and the Pivoted Multiple Brush, American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 102, No. 3, pp. 507-529
Marilyn Y. Goldberg, (1983), “Greek Temples and Chinese Roofs,” American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 87, No. 3. pp. 305–310
Martin Robinson, (1992). The Art of Vase-Painting in Classical Athens, Cambridge.
Orjan Wikander, (1990), “Archaic Roof Tiles the First Generations,” Hesperia, Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 285–290
Penrose, F.C., (1893), The Orientation of Geek Temples, Nature, v.48, n.1228, pp.42-43
Whitley, James (2001). The Archaeology of Ancient Greece. Cambridge University Press. pp. 286.
William Rostoker; and Elizabeth Gebhard, (1981), “The Reproduction of Rooftiles for the Archaic Temple of Poseidon at Isthmia, Greece,” Journal of Field Archaeology, Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 211–2.
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