Cimon

Topics: Ancient Greece, Greece, Delian League Pages: 2 (442 words) Published: March 2, 2014
CIMON

He was the son of Miltiades and a member of the Athenian aristocracy and conservative in his politics.

Paid the 50 talents fine of his father.

Served in the Persians wars
‘… he was fully the equal of Themistocles and his own father Miltiades.’

He was a protégé of Aristides who recognized his cleverness and audacity.

From 478-461 he led the Delian League forces.

He was pro-Spartan and believed in a policy of dual hegemony. He named one of his sons Lacedaemonius and he ‘enjoyed a privileged position with the Spartans.’

Activities of the Delian League under Cimon

478-477 The capture of Byzantium
Control of Byzantium open the vital trade route to the Black Sea

476-5 The siege and capture of Eion
On the mouth of the Strymon Eion had been a major supply depot for the Persians. It dominated the east west route and the hinterland was rich in natural resources, gold, silver, timber and grain.

474-3 Conquest of Scyrus
A pirate stronghold on the route to the Black Sea. Athenian cleruchs (settlers) were sent to the island. The bones of Theseus were found on the island and brought back to Athens.

472 The coercion of Carystus
An important Greek city on the southern tip of Euboea, Carystus was forced into the League after refusing to join, losing its independence. Making war on a Greek city and depriving it of its independence was considered an outrage by most of the Greeks.

469 The revolt and subjugation of Naxos
One of the largest and most important islands in the Aegean, attempted to secede and was forced back into the League by siege. Naxos was stripped of its independence, and probably its fleet. It was forced to pay tribute and became a subject ally of Athens.

468 The Battle of the Eurymedon
This was a spectacular victory over the Persians by land and sea off the southern coast of Asia Minor at the mouth of the Eurymedon river. After this great victory many states believed the Delian League had...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free