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Topics: Prostitution, Human trafficking, Human sexual behavior Pages: 86 (17152 words) Published: January 19, 2014
Internet Journal of Criminology © 2013
ISSN 2045-6743 (Online)

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF REGULATING
PROSTITUTION
By Nazmina Begum1

Abstract

This dissertation will focus on the significance of regulating prostitution. The UK Government currently regulates prostitution because the conduct attracts many problems such as drug use, violence, public nuisance, organised crimes, human trafficking, child prostitution, and exploitation. However, these problems are still present in the UK. Thus, there have been suggestions that perhaps the UK should take a different approach to prostitution to tackle these problems more effectively. This dissertation will aim to formulate a framework for the UK Government that will best tackle these drastic problems. This dissertation will present an evaluation of prostitution and prostitution laws in history. This dissertation will specify whether prostitution should be accepted as a trade like any other lawful trades or whether the UK should view prostitution as oppression, slavery, and coercion. Finally, there will be an investigation into the reform proposals to demonstrate the significance of regulating prostitution and whether any changes to the current UK laws and policies on prostitution could be made in order to pragmatically tackle the underlying problems of prostitution.

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A dissertation submitted by Nazmina Begum to the School of Law of the Manchester Metropolitan University in partial fulfilment of the regulations for the LL.B degree. www.internetjournalofcriminology.com

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Internet Journal of Criminology © 2013
ISSN 2045-6743 (Online)

Contents
Chapter 1: The Background of Prostitution
………………………………………………………………………………………5 Chapter 2: Regulating Prostitution
Chapter 3: Sex-work or Sexual
Slavery?………………………………………………………………………………………….19 Chapter 4: Exploring the Different Approaches to Prostitution Abolishment
approach………………………………………………………………………………………………………….23 Overall
conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………….340

www.internetjournalofcriminology.com

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Internet Journal of Criminology © 2013
ISSN 2045-6743 (Online)

Introduction
Prostitution is a trade between sex and money and is known as the ‘world’s oldest profession’. This dissertation will focus on prostitution as it has raised a serious public policy debate and is on-going in terms of the nature of prostitution and the State’s control of prostitution and prostitution-related activities which include soliciting, kerb-crawling, brothel keeping and pimping. A person who commissions the sexual intercourse in return for money, or anything that is valuable, is known as a prostitute. Although prostitution requires low skills, it has been rated as one of the most remarkable money making professions. However, prostitution has been central to many problems. The existence of prostitution involves women and children in sexual slavery; increases rates of human trafficking; causes a nuisance to the public; exposes women and children to exploitation and violence; leads to social orders such as drug use; causes the spreading of venereal diseases amongst the nation; and is essential to organised crime. Thus, countries all over the world have taken different legal approaches to prostitution in order to tackle these problems and maintain a safe and secure nation. The UK regulates prostitution to achieve this by prohibiting on-street prostitution and prostitution related activities. However, the fundamental problems of prostitution are still in existence in the UK. It is argued that the UK regulations increase unsafe on-street prostitution and encourage underground prostitution, which in effect increases these problems. Thus, there has been a call for reform. This dissertation will examine whether the legal approach to prostitution in other countries better tackle these problems, or whether the UK should continue regulating prostitution as it currently is and additionally seek to remedy the routes to...

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