Human Trafficking Canada a source country

Topics: Human trafficking, Prostitution, Commercial sexual exploitation of children Pages: 13 (4141 words) Published: May 25, 2014


ESSAY ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND HOW CANADA
CAN REDUCE THEIR STANDING AS A DESTINATION COUNTRY

Canada is recognized and trusted as a country who will work with all countries towards common good. Past performance as consensus builders and peace makers coupled with implementing strong economic policies that enabled Canada to remain competitive in the recent economic crisis bodes well in bringing issues to the table effecting Canada’s standing as a destination country. Despite the close proximity to the United States of America [USA], Canada is seen as independent and different, a country that can bring solutions and achieve consensus on reducing Canada’s standing as a destination country related to Human Trafficking. It is with that focus that the following position is presented. Given the positive position that Canada enjoys politically, Canada is in a unique position to offer and carry out a co-ordination role to member nations. Canada can share their expertise in policy development, training material, enforcement initiatives, and information, communications and prevention measures in an effort to address human trafficking worldwide. To carry this out Canada would need to take on a leading role by: 1) enforcing the current laws they have enacted consistently; 2) effecting the trafficker’s ability and intent to use Canada as a destination; 3) supporting a human trafficking coordination center to support information exchange and provide support to victims of human trafficking. It has been twelve years since the protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children came into effect. Since that time changes to the legal system have been undertaken; threat risk assessments on human trafficking have been carried out; the new Canadian Human Trafficking Action Plan was unveiled; victims have received confirmation a new Victims Bill of Rights will be drafted; and the mobilization of non-government organizations [NGO’s] have begun meeting to determine protocols on sharing information. Despite past challenges these new initiatives provide an opportunity and fresh start to refocus and take a leadership and coordination role to combat Human Trafficking. According to the United Nations Office of Drugs & Crime Global Report on Human trafficking 2012 [UNODC 2012], the global perspective of trafficking in persons is difficult to assess because trafficking can originate in any country and conclude in any other country. Human trafficking is unlike any other illicit enterprise such as those of trafficking in drugs or firearms. Opiates or cocaine clearly originate from drug-producing countries like countries that can manufacture firearms. Similarly, if you look at environmental crimes they are restricted to countries where certain natural resources abound. While most other types of trafficking have geographical limitations with respect to sources or destination markets, trafficking in persons does not.1 That lack of geographical boundaries is reflected in the large number of countries affected by trafficking in persons that is supported by documentation of the event. Approximately 460 distinct trafficking flows2 can be identified in the period 2007-2010 and beyond. During that period, victims of 136 different nationalities were detected in 118 countries across the world. According to the (UNODC, 2012) report it is not possible to categorize countries generally or Canada exclusively as an origin or destination country. With a few exceptions, most countries are both origins of human trafficking towards other destinations as well as destinations for people trafficked from other countries simultaneously3. The data show that victims tend to be trafficked within the same region domestically or across an adjacent border much more frequently than to other regions. Trafficked victims of Western and Central European countries are almost...

References: United Nations. (2003). The National Plan of Action for Children U.N. 2003.Retrieved from http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/canada2003.html Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Canada, U.N. Doc. CRC/C/15/Add.215 (2003).
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • human trafficking Essay
  • Human Trafficking Essay
  • Human Trafficking Essay
  • Human Trafficking Essay
  • Human Trafficking Essay
  • Human Trafficking Essay
  • Essay about Human Trafficking
  • Essay about Human Trafficking

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free