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Topics: Buddhism, Pure Land Buddhism, Bodhisattva Pages: 116 (29200 words) Published: December 18, 2013
Taming the Monkey Mind
A Guide to Pure Land Practice
by the Buddhist Scholar Cheng Wei-an
Translation with Commentary by
Dharma Master Suddhisukha

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E-mail: bdea@buddhanet.net
Web site: www.buddhanet.net

Buddha Dharma Education Association Inc.

Taming The
Monkey Mind
A Guide to Pure Land Practice

by the Buddhist scholar Cheng Wei-an
Translation with Commentary by
Dharma Master Suddhisukha

Sutra Translation Committee of the U. S. and Canada
New York – San Francisco – Niagara Falls – Toronto
May 2000

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The Chinese original of this translation,
Nien-fo ssu-shih-pa fa by the Buddhist
scholar Cheng Wei-an, is reprinted
(together with Elder Master Yin Kuang’s
work Ching-yeh Chin- liang) in: Ch’en
Hsi-yuan, ed., Ching-t’u Ch’ieh-yao
[Essentials of Pure Land], Taiwan, 1968.
Cheng Wei-an’s text has been translated
into Vietnamese twice, under the title 48
Phap Niem Phat by Trinh Vi-Am. The
better known version was published in
1963 with a commentary by Dharma
Master Thich Tinh Lac (Skt: Suddhisukha).

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Contents
List of Contents
Note to the English Edition

x5

Acknowledgements

x6

Pure Land in a Nutshell

x7

Preface

10

Text: 48 Aspects of Buddha Recitation 12

Appendices:
The Bodhi Mind

x75

Introduction to Pure Land Buddhism

113

Notes

135

Index

147

Dedication of Merit

150
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Note to the English Edition
The present treatise, a Pure Land classic, is part of a
multilingual series on Pure Land Buddhism published
by the Sutra Translation Committee of the United States
and Canada. It deals specifically with the main practice
of the Pure Land School – Buddha Recitation – and
covers both the noumenal and phenomenal aspects of
that practice. The treatise is accompanied by the detailed commentary of an Elder Master of the Zen and Pure Land lineages. Readers not familiar with Pure
Land theory may wish to begin with Dr. J. C. Cleary’s
introduction.
***
Of all the forms of Buddhism practiced in East Asia,
Pure Land has been the most widespread for over a
millennium. It can be found throughout the Mahayana
canon, with specific references in more than 200 texts
(Encyclopedia of Buddhism). In one such text, the
Avatamsaka Sutra, the story is told of a wordless sutra,
“equal in extent to the universe, existing in each and
every atom.” What is this sutra? It is the Sutra of the
Mind – the embodiment of the tenet that “everything is
made from Mind alone.”
And so we come to a key teaching which underlies the
entire Buddhist canon, in which Pure Land figures so
prominently: to attain the Mind of Enlightenment, to
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become a Buddha, the first step is development of the
Bodhi Mind – the aspiration to achieve Buddhahood for
the benefit of all sentient beings. It is with this parting
thought that we leave the reader, as we wish him a
pleasant excursion into Buddha Recitation, a profound
yet democratic form of Buddhist practice.
Minh Thanh & P. D. Leigh, Editors (English edition)
Rye Brook, New York: Festival of Amitabha, 12/99
Suddhisukha
Temple of Zen
Summer Retreat, 1963

Acknowledgements
We respectfully and gratefully acknowledge the support
and counsel of Dharma Master Lok To, Master Thich
Phuoc Bon and Rev. K. Watanabe, along with the
helpful comments and suggestions of Upasaka Hien Mat
(who gladly reviewed this entire book in less than a
ksana!), Upasaka Minh Con and Upasaka Sean Everett.
Special mention is due to Upasaka Thieu Chuu, who
through his own vernacular translation of this commentary more than half a century ago, clarified many difficult passages and transcendental points of Dharma. Without their invaluable contributions, this book would

not have been possible.
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Pure Land in a Nutshell
Of the various forms of Buddhism that developed after
the demise of the historical Buddha in 480 B. C., Mahayana (the “Great Vehicle”)...
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