the negative effects of porn

Topics: Pornography, Prostitution, Human trafficking Pages: 8 (1722 words) Published: December 8, 2014

ENC 1101
The Negative Effects of Pornography
The pornography industry is no stranger to our modern society. In fact it’s a trade that has produced over billions of dollars. According to National Center for Biotechnology Information, $57.0 billion world-wide and $12.0 billion in the United States to be exact. (Brigham Young University, 2014) Pornography may have the illusion that it promotes healthy sexual freedom to the public, but in reality statistics show the pornography industry has many more harmful effects than positive. The pornography industry should be banned because it does not influence healthy sexual communication, but creates a demand for filmed prostitution, leads to human trafficking, and promotes violence to its audience with unrealistic, hostile images.

With internet available to practically anyone, even on your cell phone, pornography has increased in popularity. Every second $3,075.64 is spent on pornography and 28,258 Internet users are viewing pornography. Eleven years old is now the typical age for the first time watching pornography. (Family Safe Media, 2014) Those who experience porn at such a young age are easily influenced with what they are watching. Kids typically think it is okay to act violently towards others, especially women. If you go on a mainstream porn website, there will be different links of categories of porn. You can find the rape category side by side with the humiliation category, the abuse, and even crying category. Pornography displays the male domination of women and sells anger and violence to its audience. When young teens or even children watch these displays, one begins to think that is what is socially acceptable or normal. When watching a porn video, one never sees the display of love or affection, such as hugging, caressing, kissing, or even an affectionate stare. The camera is usually focused only on the penetration of the male into the female and the actors are forced into uncomfortable positions. Most often violent, derogatory words are spoken between the two. No healthy sexual communication is shown. Ran Gavrieli, who studies at Tel Aviv University, was featured in a TEDx video (which is a program of local, self organized events that are related to the popular TEDTalks videos) who lectured about porn-influenced cultural damages. In the video, Why I stopped watching porn: Ran Gavrieli at TEDxJaffa (2013), he explains when he stopped watching porn he stopped contributing to the industry that he felt was taking part in creating a demand for filmed prostitution. Ran Gavrieli, says, “I’m all for sexual freedom, physically and emotionally safe sex. Porn is not an embodiment of freedom; it’s an embodiment of sex exploitation, working side by side with human trafficking, raping, pimping, soliciting.” Our society views sex trafficking as something only seen over seas and it is something that needs to be put to an end, but views pornography solely as entertainment. If you break down the word pornography, it better helps understand how this industry is linked to sexual exploitation. Pornography comes from the Greek words prone, meaning “prostituted women” or prostitution, the word graphos, meaning “writings.” (Stutler, 2014) Catherine Mackinon, author of Pornography as Trafficking, says, “Consuming pornography is an experience of bought sex” and thus it creates a hunger to continue to purchase and objectify, and act out what is seen. (Mackinon, 34) Melissa Farley, author of Prostitution and Trafficking in Nevada: Making the Connections (2007) explains if you look in a very literal way, pornography is advertising for trafficking, not just in general but also in the sense that traffickers and pimps use pornographic images of victims as specific advertising for their “products.” (Farley, 153) Even at times the performance of sexual acts are filmed and distributed without knowledge or consent of the participant or participants in the video. Pornography can now be...

Cited: Family Safe Media (2014). Pornography Statistics. Family Safe Media. Retrieved from
http://www.familysafemedia.com/pornography_statistics.html
Farley, Melissa. Prostitution and Trafficking in Nevada: Making the Connections. San Francisco, CA: Prostitution Research & Education, 2007. Print, 153.
Introduction. Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality. Trans. Gail Dines. Boston: Beacon, 2010. N. pag. Print.
Jensen, Robert. "“Just a John? Pornography and Men’s Choices”." Second Annual Conference on the College Male. Saint John’s University, Collegeville, MN. 26 Feb. 2005. Utexas.edu. Web. 27 Apr. 2014.
Lubben, Shelly. "Covenant Eyes." Covenant Eyes. N.p., 29 Oct. 2008. Web. 02 Apr. 2014.
Mackinnon, Catharine A. “Pornography as Trafficking.” Pornography: Driving the Demand in International Sex Trafficking. By David E. Guinn and Julie DiCaro. [Los Angeles]: Captive Daughters Media, 2007. 31-42. Print, 34.
"Pornography Statistics." Welcome to Women 's Services. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Apr. 2014.
Stutler, Ana. "The Connections Between Pornography and Sex Trafficking." Richmond Justice Initiative. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Apr. 2014.
Professor Daniels
April 30, 2014
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